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Pearl Izumi P.R.O Bib Knickers

Review: Pearl Izumi P.R.O Bib Knickers

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We Liked

As mentioned in previous Pearl Izumi reviews, Pearl started out making jerseys and shorts in the cycling industry and have been around for quite some time. With these roots, bib knickers are a natural progression for this company. The P.R.O. line, which stands for Performance and Race Optimized, is their elite line of garments. Only the best materials are utilized in making these garments. The P.R.O. 3D chamois is anatomically pre-shaped with variable density. This translates to saddle happiness! I was very pleased with the weight and performance of this garment. The P.R.O. Bib Knickers have a great cut to them and have the biggest reflective area on a bib knicker that I have seen so far. Pearl's designers added plenty of nighttime visibility with the generous amounts of reflective material on the logos, front of the thighs and back of the knees. They really do work! The Thermal MicroSensor fabric is a medium weight fabric with a soft-brushed fleece interior. Very nice! Upon further inspection, I noticed the garment tag on the inside of the back of the knickers. While the fabric is imported, the tag listed that the garment was made (cut and assembled) in the USA, which really rocks! The bib shoulder straps are Pearl's 4-way stretch micro sensor mesh , which offers breathability. The P.R.O. Bib Knickers are perfect for a chilly fall morning or evening ride. They are also an excellent choice for throwing down at any cyclocross race.

We Didn't Like

We would really like to see a pair of P.R.O. Bib Knickers that are constructed with water-resistant fabric. This would be awesome for chilly wet morning rides in the Pacific NW!

The Final Say

Get a pair of the P.R.O. Bib Knickers! You will love how they feel and their wide temperature range. The medium weight fabric works like a heavy weight without adding bulk. The Bib Knickers are a great item to have on hand when the days get shorter and colder. This is the time of year that most riders are likely to get caught riding home in the waning light with quickly dropping temperatures. They will serve you well in the Fall, early Winter and throughout late Spring

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